Machine Tool Technology 2022-08-25T15:51:00-04:00

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Machine Tool Technology

Associate in Specialized Technology Degree

Machinists design and create the prototypes from which most metal and other manufactured items are made, from large heavy machinery to small hand tools. Working in a modern, fully-equipped machine shop, students in this program gain the knowledge and skills needed to cut, shape, form, and fabricate metal items using machine tools. This high-precision trade requires development of skills in the use of hand tools, measuring instruments, testing equipment, and basic, automatic, and computer-numerically-controlled (CNC) machine tools. The program also covers machine tool maintenance, welding, and heat treating, as well as accident prevention, foremanship, and quality control.

Students learn through theory courses and practical experience on shop assignments and maintenance projects. Freshmen work on basic projects such as tooling, and they learn to operate various machines. Juniors are involved in blueprint projects, maintenance tasks, and making items needed by the college. Seniors undertake more complex projects and maintenance assignments chosen from a variety of options.

Introduction to the Program

Harold “Butch” Ney, Director of Machine Tool Technology

“Working in a modern, fully-equipped machine shop, students in this program gain the knowledge and skills needed to cut, shape, form, and fabricate metal items using machine tools. This high-precision trade requires development of skills in the use of hand tools, measuring instruments, testing equipment, and basic, automatic, and computer-numerically-controlled (CNC) machine tools.”

Employment Information

Potential Machine Tool Technology Jobs

  • Apprentice Machinist
  • Apprentice Mold Maker
  • Apprentice Tool Maker
  • CNC Machinist
  • CNC Programmer/Operator
  • CNC Setup Operator
  • Cryo-Machinery Technician
  • Equipment Operator
  • Fabricator
  • Field Service Technician
  • Industrial Maintenance Mechanic
  • Junior Model Maker
  • Machine Operator
  • Machinist
  • Maintenance Machinist
  • Maintenance Mechanic
  • Maintenance Technician
  • Manufacturing Technician
  • Mechanic
  • Melt Operator
  • Millwright
  • Mold Technician
  • NC Programmer
  • Nuclear Tech Mechanic
  • Plant Technician
  • Production Technician
  • R&D Machinist
  • Service Technician
  • Tool and Die Maker

Who Has Hired Our Graduates?

  • Able Services
  • Acero Precision
  • Active Crane Rentals
  • Air Products and Chemicals
  • All Metal Fabricators
  • API Technologies Corp.
  • Atlantic Valve Services
  • Big B Manufacturing
  • Bihler of America, Inc.
  • The Boeing Company
  • Broadway Amusement Rides
  • Cadence Aerospace
  • Carpenter Technology Corp.
  • Covanta Energy
  • Delaware Metals
  • Dixon Tool & Die Co.
  • Eaton Aerospace
  • Einstein Medical Center
  • Electro-Mechanical Integrators, Inc.
  • Emmert Welding
  • Exelon Corp.
  • FMC Corporation
  • Gardner Denver
  • Genpact
  • GIW Industries
  • Globus Medical
  • Gwynedd Manufacturing
  • Harvey’s Lock and Door Service
  • Hutchinson Industries
  • H-V Industries
  • Ironwood Generating Station
  • J & J Snack Foods Corp.
  • Jabil, Inc.
  • Janssen Biotech
  • JGM Welding and Fabricating Services
  • Kencor Elevator Systems
  • Kennedy Tool & Die
  • Kingsbury, Inc.
  • KNF Neuberger
  • Lyons Industries
  • Marlton Pike Precision
  • Milacron
  • Monroe Energy
  • Moog Components Group
  • Newport News Shipbuilding
  • ONExia, Inc.
  • Pailetti USA
  • Pamarco
  • PECO
  • Pincus Elevator
  • Potts Welding & Boiler Repair
  • Powerhouse
  • Precision Custom Components
  • Precision Roll Grinders, Inc.
  • PRL Industries
  • PSEG
  • Quality Craft Molds
  • Siemens AG
  • Southco
  • TIMET
  • USA Spares, Inc.
  • Valley Precision Tool & Technology

Machine Tool Technology Courses

CNCP 241 Introduction to CNC Programming (1.5 credits) Provides a foundational introduction to computer-numerical control machining, including its history, evolution, use, and application in the industry. Also include an overview of different types of formatting and codes as well as approaches.

CNCP 242 Introduction to CNC Practice (1 credit) Provides opportunities for the simultaneous application of knowledge gained in CNCP 241.

CNCP 251 CNC Programming I (2 credits) Examines the purpose and history of computer-numerical-controlled machines (CNC) and provides instruction in the writing of basic CNC programs using the incremental and absolute methods of the Cartesian coordinate system. Also prepares students to write individual manual programs that include standard industrial preparatory and miscellaneous codes for machine tool programming.

CNCP 252 CNC Practice I (1.5 credits) Provides instruction in the safe set-up and operation of CNC machines and practical training in entering programs, setting tool lengths, proving and modifying programs, and handling and transferring data and use of Computer Aided Manufacturing software.

CNCP 261 CNC Programming II (2 credits) Offers an introduction to computer-aided machining (CAM), including programming jobs directly from CAD data and from prints by geometric definition. Covers two-and-one-half and 3-axis programming and manual programming applying standard industry codes to CNC lathes and machining centers.

CNCP 262 CNC Practice II (2 credits) Provides advanced instruction in the operation of CNC machines and CAM programming, including entering and editing programs, handling and transferring data through direct numerical control (DNC), and performing set-up and fixturing of parts and machines.

MACH 111 Basic Machine Shop Theory I (3 credits) Offers an introduction to the occupation and industry of machinists, tool and die makers, and related specialists. Includes accident prevention, basic metal properties, and development of knowledge and competency in the safe utilization, operation, and maintenance of hand tools, portable power tools, measuring instruments, wire wheels and buffers, belt sanders, drilling machines, cutoff and contour machines, pedestal grinders, tool grinders, and lathes, as well as in the use of lubricants and coolants.

MACH 112 Basic Machine Shop Practice I (4.5 credits) Through hands-on training and shop projects, students learn the skills required of machinists and workers in directly related crafts, including the safe utilization, operation, and maintenance of hand tools, portable power tools, measuring instruments, cutoff and contour machines, pedestal grinders, tool grinders, and lathes.

MACH 121 Basic Machine Shop Theory II (3 credits) Covers accident prevention and the safe utilization, operation, and maintenance of lathes (part two), Bridgeport mills, shapers, planers, vertical mills, horizontal mills, precision instruments, and surface grinders.

MACH 122 Basic Machine Shop Practice II (4.5 credits) Through hands-on training and shop projects, students learn the skills required for safe utilization, operation, and maintenance of lathes, Bridgeport mills, shapers and planers, vertical mills, horizontal mills, precision instruments, and surface grinders.

MACH 231 Intermediate Machine Shop Theory I (3 credits) Introduces the principles of foundry work (forging and casting), cutting speeds and feeds, surface grinding, chords and bolt circle calculations, milling machines, and the use of the machinery handbook.

MACH 232 Intermediate Machine Shop Practice I (3.5 credits) Further develops skills previously introduced and provides training in turning, threading, knurling, milling, surface grinding, heat treating, blueprint reading, and inspection.

MACH 233 Lean Manufacturing and Quality Control (2 credits) Introduces concepts of Lean Manufacturing, waste reduction in manufacturing, Six Sigma concepts on reducing variation in manufacturing, and Total Productive Maintenance (the process of using machines, equipment, employees, and supporting processes to maintain and improve the integrity of production and the quality of systems).

MACH 239 General Industry Safety (2 credits) Provides training in safety topics associated with workplace hazards, including the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of workplace hazards, and provides overview information regarding OSHA, including workers’ rights, employer responsibilities. Qualified students will receive the OSHA 30 card at the completion of the course.

MACH 241 Intermediate Machine Shop Theory II (3 credits) Covers tool and cutter grinding, gear manufacturing and nomenclature, electrical discharge machining (EDM), geometric tolerances, indexing, dividing heads, and an introduction to numerical control.

MACH 242 Intermediate Machine Shop Practice II (4 credits) Continues MACH 232 with additional shop projects designed to introduce new skills and enhance previously learned skills. Increased emphasis is placed on proficiency and productivity.

MACH 252 Advanced Machine Shop Practice I (3 credits) Emphasizes individual shop projects involving many phases of machining, machine rebuilding, production set-ups, and tool and die making. Students serve as shop foreman on a rotating basis.

MACH 262 Advanced Machine Shop Practice II (3 credits) Offers additional shop work with individual hands-on projects involving various phases of machining, machine rebuilding, production set-ups, and tool and die making. Students serve as shop foreman on a rotating basis.

MACH 263 Hydraulics and Pneumatics (2.5 credits) Introduces basic principles of industrial hydraulics and pneumatics, including types of fluids and their use to transmit power throughout various circuits. Examines pumps, compressors, circuit components and their application and control, and covers such elements as flow, pressure, force, temperature, torque, speed, horsepower, efficiency, fluid, and system conditioning, as well as component and circuit performance, selection, and specification. Emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of each topic.

MACH 271 Additive Manufacturing I (2 credits) A detailed overview of the field of additive manufacturing/3D printing. Emphasizes foundational concepts, processes, materials, and the use of CAD related to the processes.

MACH 272 Robotic Manufacturing I (2 credits) A detailed overview of the field of robotic manufacturing/automated systems technology. Emphasizes concepts, processes, materials, and programming for automated manufacturing techniques. Includes robot terminology, communications, applications, and safety.

MACH 273 Additive Manufacturing II (2 credits) Addresses more complex topics in the field of additive manufacturing/3D printing. Emphasizes complex processes, materials, and the use of CAD related to the processes. Includes troubleshooting techniques and advancements being made in the field.

MACH 274 Robotic Manufacturing II (2 credits) An in-depth, continuation of MACH 272, explores more complex topics in the field of robotic manufacturing/automated systems technology. Emphasizes complex processes, materials, and various types of automation. Explores troubleshooting techniques and advancements being made in the field.

MACH 275 EDM (2 credits) A comprehensive introduction to electric discharge machining/subtractive manufacturing method for machining, this course covers: EDM definitions and processes, benefits and challenges associated with EDM, and applications.

MECH 281 Fabrication and Rigging I (2.5 credits) Provides foundational information regarding the processes of fabrication and rigging to include: terminology, practices, processes, safety, equipment, and inspection.

MECH 282 Industrial Maintenance I (2.5 credits) Provides a foundational and detailed overview of industrial maintenance. Emphasizes industry competencies related to machining and repair, including safety, processes, procedures, tools, and process control.

MECH 283 Power Transmission and Alignment I (2 credits) Provides foundational and detailed overview of transmission and alignment to include: processes, procedures, regulation, and operations.

MECH 284 Electrical Controls and Wiring I (2 credits) Provides foundational information related to the interconnection of systems and/or devices. Emphasizes terminology, tools, techniques, and troubleshooting specifically for machining.

MECH 285 Industrial Maintenance II (2.5 credits) Building on information from MECH 282, gives a more detailed and complex coverage of industrial maintenance for machining. Emphasizes industry competencies related to machining, including safety, processes, procedures, tools, and process control. Also includes future forward developments in the field.

MECH 286 Power Transmission and Alignment II (2.5 credits) Building on elements of MECH 283, provides a detailed and more complex coverage of topics related to transmission and alignment, including processes, procedures, regulation, and operations. Also includes emphasis on future forward developments in the field and complex troubleshooting.

MECH 287 Electrical Controls and Wiring II (2.5 credits) Building on concepts covered in MECH 284, provides complex information related to the interconnection of systems and/or devices. Emphasizes terminology, tools, techniques, and troubleshooting specifically for machining and Machine Repair. Also includes future forward developments in the field and complex troubleshooting techniques.

MECH 288 Advanced Hydraulics and Pneumatics (2 credits) Expands on the introduction to the fundamentals of hydraulics and pneumatics principles provided in MACH 263. Through the use of trainers and other hands-on lab activities, instructs the learner to recognize and understand many different components used in industrial hydraulics and pneumatics. Emphasizes complex theoretical and practical problem solving related to fluid/air power.

MECH 289 Fabrication and Rigging II (2 credits) Builds on foundational information regarding the processes of fabrication and rigging in MECH 281. Emphasizes future forward developments in the field and in technology related to the field, as well as troubleshooting.

METL 251 Metallurgy I (2 credits) Covers metallurgical theory and practice, including hardening, hardness testing, specimen preparation, and recognition and analysis of crystal structures using metallographic equipment.

METL 261 Metallurgy II (2 credits) Examines the theory and practical applications of metallurgy through involvement in class presentations and laboratory exercises, including laboratory projects that consist of a comparison of the effects of tempering on carbon-based tool steels and preparation of tensile specimens utilizing tensile testing equipment.