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Machine Tool Technology

Associate in Specialized Technology Degree

Machinists design and create the prototypes from which most metal and other manufactured items are made, from large heavy machinery to small hand tools. Working in a modern, fully-equipped machine shop, students in this program gain the knowledge and skills needed to cut, shape, form, and fabricate metal items using machine tools. This high-precision trade requires development of skills in the use of hand tools, measuring instruments, testing equipment, and basic, automatic, and computer-numerically-controlled (CNC) machine tools. The program also covers machine tool maintenance, welding, and heat treating, as well as accident prevention, foremanship, and quality control.

Students learn through theory courses and practical experience on shop assignments and maintenance projects. Freshmen work on basic projects such as tooling, and they learn to operate various machines. Juniors are involved in blueprint projects, maintenance tasks, and making items needed by the School. Seniors undertake more complex projects and maintenance assignments chosen from a variety of options.

This program is designed to develop the knowledge, techniques, and skills required to function in the manufacturing industries at an advanced apprentice level in such occupational areas as machining (machinist, tool and die maker), drafting, CAD, CAM, CNC programming, and machine maintenance, or to be employed as an engineering technician. Students learn basic, intermediate, and advanced principles of the machine trades, CNC programming, and drafting, and receive fundamental preparation in safety, computers (including CAD), welding, metallurgy, tool design, hydraulics and pneumatics, and supervision.

Introduction to the Program

Carmen Martella, Director of Machine Tool Technology

“Working in a modern, fully-equipped machine shop, students in this program gain the knowledge and skills needed to cut, shape, form, and fabricate metal items using machine tools. This high-precision trade requires development of skills in the use of hand tools, measuring instruments, testing equipment, and basic, automatic, and computer-numerically-controlled (CNC) machine tools.”

Employment Information

  • Apprentice Machinist
  • Auto CAD Designer
  • Auto Welder
  • Burner Technician
  • CAD Draftsman
  • CAD Operator
  • CNC Machinist
  • CNC Operator
  • CNC Programmer
  • Facility Maintenance Machinist
  • Field Service Technician
  • Hazardous Materials Operator
  • Machinist
  • Maintenance Machinist
  • Maintenance Mechanic
  • Mechanic
  • Model Maker
  • Motorcycle Technician
  • Operating Technician
  • Plant Maintenance
  • Sales
  • Screw Machine Operator
  • Supervisor
  • Technical Support Representative
  • Accurate Tool Co., Inc.
  • Advanced Scientific
  • All Metals Fabricators
  • Anderson-Bowen Industrial Equipment Co., Inc.
  • Aker American Shipping, Inc.
  • Black & Decker Co.
  • Boeing
  • Brenner Tool and Die, Inc.
  • Chalmers & Kubeck, Inc.
  • Chowns Fabrication & Rigging
  • CITI Steel USA Inc.
  • ConocoPhillips Co.
  • Cressona Aluminum Co.
  • Dauphin Graphic Machines, Inc.
  • Dechert Dynamics Corporation
  • E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co.
  • East Coast Cycle Center, Inc.
  • Eaton Aerospace
  • Elliott Machine Works, Inc.
  • Exelon Corporation
  • FDI-Berg Electronics
  • Florida Power & Light Co.
  • Flowserve Corporation
  • GAM Manufacturing Co.
  • General Physics Corp.
  • GETRAG Corporate Group
  • H&H Disposal Co.
  • International Material Control Systems, Inc.
  • Kennametal Industrial Product Group
  • Kline Machinery, Inc.
  • Koenig Engineering, Inc.
  • Kruse Machine
  • Lenape Forged Products, Corp.
  • Marble Crafters USA
  • Metal Industries, Inc.
  • Northrop Gruman Corporation
  • Packaging Technologies
  • Phillips
  • PoolPak Technologies Corporation
  • Potts Welding & Boiler Repair Co., Inc.
  • Progress Energy
  • PSEG
  • John Prosock Machine, Inc.
  • Reliant Energy
  • Richmond Screw Anchor Co.
  • Ruby Machine & Tool & Die
  • Siemens AG
  • Self-Employed
  • F.L. Smithe Machine Co., Inc.
  • Southco
  • Stein Seal
  • Sumatech
  • Synthes, Inc.
  • Tura Machine Corp.
  • Waukesha Bearing Corporation
  • White’s Machine, Inc.
  • Williams Bridge Co.
  • Xynatech, Inc.
  • Zemco Manufacturing, Inc.

Machine Tool Technology Courses

CNCP 251 CNC Programming I (2 credits) Examines the purpose and history of computer-numerical-controlled machines (CNC) and provides instruction in the writing of basic CNC programs using the incremental and absolute methods of the Cartesian coordinate system. Also prepares students to write individual manual programs that include standard industrial preparatory and miscellaneous codes for machine tool programming.

CNCP 252 CNC Practice I (3 credits) Provides instruction in the safe set-up and operation of CNC machines and practical training in entering programs, setting tool lengths, proving and modifying programs, handling and transferring data, and use of Computer-Aided Manufacturing software.

CNCP 261 CNC Programming II (2 credits) Offers an introduction to computer-aided machining (CAM), including programming jobs directly from CAD data and from prints by geometric definition. Covers 2 1/2 and 3-axis programming and manual programming applying standard industry codes to CNC lathes and machining centers.

CNCP 262 CNC Practice II (3 credits) Provides advanced instruction in the operation of CNC machines and CAM programming, including entering and editing programs, handling and transferring data through direct numerical control (DNC), and performing set-up and fixturing of parts and machines.

MACH 111 Basic Machine Shop Theory I (3 credits) Offers an introduction to the occupation and industry of machinists, tool and die makers, and related specialists. Includes accident prevention, basic metal properties, and development of knowledge and competency in the safe utilization, operation, and maintenance of hand tools, portable power tools, measuring instruments, wire wheels and buffers, belt sanders, drilling machines, cutoff and contour machines, pedestal grinders, tool grinders, and lathes, as well as in the use of lubricants and coolants.

MACH 112 Basic Machine Shop Practice I (8 credits) Through hands-on training and shop projects, students learn the skills required of machinists and workers in directly related crafts, including the safe utilization, operation, and maintenance of hand tools, portable power tools, measuring instruments, cutoff and contour machines, pedestal grinders, tool grinders, and lathes.

MACH 113 Motors and Controls (1.5 credits) Familiarizes Machine Shop students with the principles of motor control and controllers, industrial wiring, and electrical safety. Develops an understanding of related National Electrical Code (NEC) standards through laboratory exercises and practical wiring assignments.

MACH 121 Basic Machine Shop Theory II (3 credits) Covers accident prevention and the safe utilization, operation, and maintenance of lathes (part two), Bridgeport mills, shapers, planers, vertical mills, horizontal mills, precision instruments, and surface grinders.

MACH 122 Basic Machine Shop Practice II (8 credits) Through hands-on training and shop projects, students learn the skills required for safe utilization, operation, and maintenance of lathes, Bridgeport mills, shapers and planers, vertical mills, horizontal mills, precision instruments, and surface grinders.

MACH 143 Industrial Materials (1.5 credits) Introduces the utilization of various materials in manufacturing, such as metals, fiberglass, ceramics, adhesives, concrete, plastics, and composites.

MACH 231 Intermediate Machine Shop Theory I (3 credits) Introduces the principles of foundry work (forging and casting), cutting speeds and feeds, surface grinding, chords and bolt circle calculations, milling machines, and the use of the machinery handbook.

MACH 232 Intermediate Machine Shop Practice I (7 credits) Further develops skills previously introduced and provides training in turning, threading, knurling, milling, surface grinding, heat treating, blueprint reading, and inspection.

MACH 241 Intermediate Machine Shop Theory II (3 credits) Covers tool and cutter grinding, gear manufacturing and nomenclature, electrical discharge machining (EDM), geometric tolerances, indexing, dividing heads, and an introduction to numerical control.

MACH 242 Intermediate Machine Shop Practice II (7.5 credits) Continues MACH 232 with additional shop projects designed to introduce new skills and enhance previously learned skills. Increased emphasis is placed on proficiency and productivity.

MACH 252 Advanced Machine Shop Practice I (7 credits) Emphasizes individual shop projects involving many phases of machining, machine rebuilding, production set-ups, and tool and die making. Students serve as shop foreman on a rotating basis.

MACH 262 Advanced Machine Tool Technology Practice (7.5 credits) Offers additional shop work with individual hands-on projects involving various phases of machining, machine rebuilding, production set-ups, and tool and die making. Students serve as shop foreman on a rotating basis.

MACH 263 Hydraulics and Pneumatics (2.5 credits) Introduces basic principles of industrial hydraulics and pneumatics, including types of fluids and their use to transmit power throughout various circuits. Examines pumps, compressors, circuit components and their application and control, and covers such elements as flow, pressure, force, temperature, torque, speed, horsepower, efficiency, fluid, and system conditioning, as well as component and circuit performance, selection, and specification. Emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of each topic.

METL 251 Metallurgy I (2 credits) Covers metallurgical theory and practice, including hardening, hardness testing, specimen preparation, and recognition and analysis of crystal structures using metallographic equipment.

METL 261 Metallurgy II (2 credits) Examines the theory and practical applications of metallurgy through involvement in class presentations and laboratory exercises, including laboratory projects that consist of a comparison of the effects of tempering on carbon-based tool steels and preparation of tensile specimens utilizing tensile testing equipment.

TDSN 251 Tool Design I (2 credits) Introduces the concepts of designing safe tooling for production, limited production, and making one-of-a-kind pieces. Also covers such topics as defining tooling problems, selecting proper machine tools, tooling costs, tooling materials, designing cutting tools (carbide seminar), work-holding principles, and jig and fixture design.

TDSN 261 Tool Design II (2 credits) Reviews jig and tool design learned in TDSN 350 and studies the design of pressworking tools and tools for welding, inspection, and gaging. Emphasizes special cases of tooling and fixturing for CNC applications and includes references to the theory of non-traditional machine tools.